What’s new in Cloud Sync Edit on GitHub Request doc changes

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NetApp periodically updates Cloud Sync to bring you new features, enhancements, and bug fixes.

8 Sept 2019

  • You can now set up sync relationships to sync data between:

    • An AWS S3 bucket and an Azure Blob container

    • An AWS S3 bucket and a Google Cloud Storage bucket

  • Azure NetApp Files (CIFS) is now supported as the source or target in a sync relationship.

  • A new sync relationship setting enables you to sync files based on the last modified date. Choose all files regardless of their last modified date, files modified after a specific date, before a specific date, or between a time range.

    A screenshot of the Date Modified option when setting the sync relationship.

15 July 2019

  • You can now subscribe to Cloud Sync from Azure where you can pay as-you-go with hourly rates, or pay up front for a year.

  • You can now deploy a data broker in AWS using your own IAM role, rather than the IAM role that Cloud Sync creates for you. You might use this option if your organization has strict security policies.

  • Cloud Sync now supports NFSv4 ACLs. When syncing data, Cloud Sync copies ACLs between NFS servers that use NFS versions 4.0, 4.1, or 4.2.

  • When you create a sync relationship to or from Google Cloud Storage, Cloud Sync no longer prompts you to provide a project ID, client email, and private key for a Cloud Storage service account. GCP access must now be provided through the data broker.

    Sync relationships that include GCP storage require a GCP data broker or an on-prem data broker that has GCP access:

20 June 2019

  • New sync relationships are supported:

  • Additional S3 storage classes are now supported when AWS S3 is the target in a sync relationship:

  • New settings enable you to define the number of retries and file types for a sync relationship.

  • Sync relationship settings were moved to a new page when setting up a relationship and when editing a relationship.

    Here’s the Settings page when creating a new relationship:

    A screenshot of the create new sync relationship wizard

    Here’s where to access the Settings option for an existing relationship:

    A screenshot of the sync relationship dashboard that shows the Settings option when hovering over an existing relationship.

  • We improved the speed of the user interface.

  • A few bugs were fixed.

16 May 2019

You can now accelerate the performance of a sync relationship by adding an additional data broker to the relationship.

21 Mar 2019

  • You can now sync data between NFS servers using data-in-flight encryption.

  • Two new sync relationships are supported:

    • Azure NetApp Files to Azure NetApp Files

    • AWS EFS to Azure NetApp Files

25 Feb 2019

Two new sync relationships are supported:

  • StorageGRID to StorageGRID

  • IBM Cloud Object Storage to IBM Cloud Object Storage

2 Dec 2018

  • S3 to S3 sync relationships are now supported.

  • When an S3 bucket is the target in a sync relationship, you can now choose an S3 storage classes:

    • Standard (this is the default class)

    • Intelligent-Tiering

    • Standard-Infrequent Access

    • One Zone-Infrequent Access

      A screenshot that shows the S3 storage class drop-down list when you set up the target S3 bucket in a new sync relationship.

8 Nov 2018

11 Oct 2018

Cloud Sync now provides additional stats about the last data sync for each sync relationship:

  • How many directories and files were scanned

  • How many directories failed to scan

  • How many directories and files were marked for copy and marked for deletion

For example, the following image shows that 684 directories were scanned and no files were marked for copy or for deletion:

A screenshot that shows the status of the last data sync for a sync relationship.

12 Sept 2018

Cloud Sync now supports deploying a data broker in Google Cloud Platform.

Just follow the prompts in Cloud Sync to deploy a virtual machine in Google Cloud Platform that runs the data broker software.

A screenshot that shows the options for deploying a data broker: in AWS

21 Aug 2018

  • IBM Cloud Object Storage is now supported as the source or target in a sync relationship with an NFS or CIFS server.

  • When creating a new sync relationship, you can choose an S3 bucket that is not associated with your AWS account.

    Screenshot that shows the Add to the list option for selecting an S3 bucket.

14 Aug 2018

Cloud Sync can now preserve access control lists (ACLs) between a source SMB/CIFS share and a target SMB/CIFS share when creating a new sync relationship.

17 July 2018

  • You can now change the sync schedule for a relationship to as frequently as 5 minutes. The default is 24 hours.

  • StorageGRID Webscale is now supported as the source in a sync relationship. The target can be an NFS or CIFS server.

10 July 2018

  • An Azure Blob container is now supported as the source or target in a sync relationship with an NFS or CIFS server.

    When setting up the sync relationship, you simply need to enter the Azure storage account name and the access key for the storage account. Then you can select the Blob container.

  • You must now select an NFS version or CIFS version when setting up a new sync relationship for an NFS or CIFS server.

    • For NFS, you can select version 3, 4.1, or 4.2.

    • For CIFS, you can select version 1.0, 2.0, 2.1, or 3.0.

  • You can now filter source objects when setting up a new sync relationship.

    Filtering source objects enables you to define how source files and folders are synced and maintained in the target location.

    You can access the option when selecting a directory:

    Screenshot that shows the Filter Source Objects option when selecting a directory.

    The following options are available when filtering source objects:

    Screenshot that shows the Sync Settings dialog box which enables you to modify settings that define how files are synced and maintained in the target location.

  • Incremental updates from an S3 bucket to an NFS or CIFS server are no longer event-driven—​they are based on a sync schedule.

April 2018

Cloud Sync now supports the NetApp Cloud Volumes Service as an NFS or CIFS server in a sync relationship.

February 2018

  • EFS to S3 and S3 to EFS sync relationships are now supported.

  • Bugs were fixed.

January 2018

  • You can now abort an in-progress sync.

    This does not break the sync relationship. Cloud Sync syncs data at the next scheduled time.

  • You can now view and select objects from S3 buckets that belong to other AWS accounts if they are shared with your account.

  • You can now use Cloud Sync with S3 buckets that are protected with AWS KMS encryption.

  • A few bugs were fixed. Most notably, you no longer have to enter AWS credentials when using the on-premises data broker.

December 2017

  • Cloud Sync now supports installing the data broker in Microsoft Azure, which enables you to sync data in and out of Azure.

  • A few bugs were fixed.

November 2017

  • Cloud Sync is now integrated with NetApp Cloud Central, which enables centralized user authentication.

  • EFS to NFS and NFS to EFS sync relationships are now supported.

  • CIFS to CIFS sync relationships are now supported.

  • A few bugs were fixed.

October 2017

  • NFS to NFS sync relationships are now supported.

  • You can now specify whether files modified prior to the scheduled sync should be excluded.

    For example, you can exclude files modified 30 seconds before the scheduled sync. This setting helps avoid copying partial changes to files that frequently change.

  • Cloud Sync now displays the number of failed transfers.

  • A few bugs were fixed.