Tutorial: NFS to NFS with in-flight data encryption Edit on GitHub Request doc changes

Contributors netapp-bcammett

If your business has strict security policies, sync data between NFS servers in different networks using data-in-flight encryption.

How data-in-flight encryption works

Data-in-flight encryption encrypts NFS data when it’s sent over the network between two data brokers.

A diagram that shows two NFS servers and two data brokers. Data flows from the source NFS server to a source data broker at which point data is encrypted. Data is then sent to the target data broker and then to the target NFS server.

One data broker functions as the initiator. When it’s time to sync data, it sends a connection request to the other data broker, which is the listener. That data broker listens for requests on port 443 (you can use a different port, if needed).

For example, if you sync data from an on-premises NFS server to a cloud-based NFS server, you can choose which data broker listens for the connection requests and which sends them.

Here’s how in-flight encryption works:

  1. After you create the sync relationship, the initiator starts an encrypted connection with the other data broker.

  2. The source data broker encrypts data from the source NFS server using TLS 1.3.

  3. It then sends the data over the network to the target data broker.

  4. The target data broker decrypts the data before sending it to the target NFS server.

  5. After the initial copy, the service syncs any changed data every 24 hours. If there is data to sync, the process starts with the initiator opening an encrypted connection with the other data broker.

    If you prefer to sync data more frequently, you can change the schedule after you create the relationship.

Supported NFS versions

Data-in-flight encryption is supported with NFS versions 3, 4.1, and 4.2.

What you’ll need to get started

Be sure to have the following:

  • Two NFS servers that meet source and target requirements.

  • The IP addresses or fully qualified domain names of the NFS servers.

  • Network locations for two data brokers.

    You can select an existing data broker but it must function as the initiator. The listener data broker must be a new data broker.

    If you have not yet deployed a data broker, review the data broker requirements. Because you have strict security policies, be sure to review the networking requirements, which includes outbound traffic from port 443 and the internet endpoints that the data broker contacts.

Syncing data between NFS servers using data-in-flight encryption

Create a new sync relationship between two NFS servers, enable the in-flight encryption option, and follow the prompts.

Steps
  1. Log in to NetApp Cloud Central and select Cloud Sync.

  2. Click Create New Sync Relationship.

  3. Drag and drop NFS Server to the source and target locations and select Yes to enable data-in-flight encryption.

    A screenshot that shows an NFS to NFS sync relationship with data-in-flight encryption enabled.

  4. Follow the prompts to create the relationship:

    1. NFS Server: Choose the NFS version and then specify a new NFS server or select an existing NFS server.

    2. Define Data Broker Functionality: Define which data broker listens for connection requests on a port and which one initiates the connection. Make your choice based on your networking requirements.

    3. Data Broker: Follow the prompts to add a new source data broker or select an existing data broker.

      If the source data broker acts as the listener, then it must be a new data broker.

      If you need a new data broker, Cloud Sync prompts you with the installation instructions. You can deploy the data broker in the cloud or download an installation script for your own Linux host.

      A screenshot showing the option to select a data broker in AWS

    4. Directories: Choose the directories that you want to sync by selecting all directories, or by drilling down and selecting a subdirectory.

      Click Filter Source Objects to modify settings that define how source files and folders are synced and maintained in the target location.

      A screenshot showing the option to select a top-level directory

    5. Target NFS Server: Choose the NFS version and then enter a new NFS server or select an existing NFS server.

    6. Target Data Broker: Follow the prompts to add a new source data broker or select an existing data broker.

      If the target data broker acts as the listener, then it must be a new data broker.

      Here’s an example of the prompt when the target data broker functions as the listener. Notice the option to specify the port.

      A screenshot showing the option to specify a port on the listener data broker.

    7. Target Directories: Select a top-level directory, or drill down to select an existing subdirectory or to create a new folder inside an export.

    8. Review: Review the details of the sync relationship and then click Create Relationship.

      A screenshot showing the review screen. It shows the NFS servers

Result

Cloud Sync starts creating the new sync relationship. When it’s done, click View in Dashboard to view details about the new relationship.